BOB MOVER, MY HEART TELLS ME

-->
He may be off the radar for a lot of listeners, but age and experience sets saxophonist and vocalist Bob Mover apart from other jazz musicians, mainly due to his extensive sideman experience with Chet Baker and Charles Mingus that informs his present day sound -- one that’s front and center on his soulful double-disc My Heart Tells Me (Motema.) As a saxophonist who’s adept on tenor, alto and soprano, Mover crisscrosses straight-up bebop style and no nonsense standards with off-kilter harmonics and makes it all swing in an exhilarating direction. And that should put him on your radar.

The set is neatly divided between Mover’s vocals on the first disc covering tunes like the rhumba-inflected “So Near And Yet So Far,” “Penthouse Serenade” and an earnestly expressive version of “By Myself” with a dream quartet (pianist Kenny Barron, bassist Bob Cranshaw and Steve Williams on drums,) while disc two expands the line up by adding trumpeter Josh Evans, Steve Hall on tenor and swaps out Williams for Victor Lewis on drums. Mover’s sandpaper rasp of a voice does indeed evoke Chet Baker; he has a comforting, late night croon that’s direct and true. Take a listen to his melancholic “You Must Believe In Spring” and you’re reminded of that hopeless romantic character that Baker played so well.   

Disc two elicits a great deal of traditional bop sounds with five Mover originals, complete with quick changes, tight improvisations and a beautiful spot to hear Cranshaw work his magic on bass on “Chet’s Chum.” Trumpeter Josh Evan was only 23 at the time of this recording and his presence lights a small fire within the group sound akin to Art Farmer or Don Cherry according to Mover.

Fellow saxophonist, NEA Jazz Master and teacher Phil Woods provides the liner notes, concisely noting each track and Mover’s ample chops as well as the rhythm section to die for. Kenny Barron, who duos with Mover on “Gone with The Wind” and “You’ve Changed” is superlative throughout the two discs and their interplay suggests the glory days when Barron played with Stan Getz -- that tightness and easy communication is evident between Barron and Mover. Mover has released nine records as a leader, played with a who’s who of jazz greats and keeps his pulse on contemporary sounds (collaborating with Esperanza Spalding, for instance.) My Heart Tells Me is a rewarding session and the perfect introduction to Mover’s heart-and-soul style. Whether you’re in the mood for Cole Porter and after hour torch songs or straight-ahead bebop fire with an agile band, Mover’s got you covered. (16 tracks; 54 minutes / 47 minutes)

Labels: , , , , , , ,

JAZZ IN SPACE: BOB MOVER, MY HEART TELLS ME

Monday, July 1, 2013

BOB MOVER, MY HEART TELLS ME

-->
He may be off the radar for a lot of listeners, but age and experience sets saxophonist and vocalist Bob Mover apart from other jazz musicians, mainly due to his extensive sideman experience with Chet Baker and Charles Mingus that informs his present day sound -- one that’s front and center on his soulful double-disc My Heart Tells Me (Motema.) As a saxophonist who’s adept on tenor, alto and soprano, Mover crisscrosses straight-up bebop style and no nonsense standards with off-kilter harmonics and makes it all swing in an exhilarating direction. And that should put him on your radar.

The set is neatly divided between Mover’s vocals on the first disc covering tunes like the rhumba-inflected “So Near And Yet So Far,” “Penthouse Serenade” and an earnestly expressive version of “By Myself” with a dream quartet (pianist Kenny Barron, bassist Bob Cranshaw and Steve Williams on drums,) while disc two expands the line up by adding trumpeter Josh Evans, Steve Hall on tenor and swaps out Williams for Victor Lewis on drums. Mover’s sandpaper rasp of a voice does indeed evoke Chet Baker; he has a comforting, late night croon that’s direct and true. Take a listen to his melancholic “You Must Believe In Spring” and you’re reminded of that hopeless romantic character that Baker played so well.   

Disc two elicits a great deal of traditional bop sounds with five Mover originals, complete with quick changes, tight improvisations and a beautiful spot to hear Cranshaw work his magic on bass on “Chet’s Chum.” Trumpeter Josh Evan was only 23 at the time of this recording and his presence lights a small fire within the group sound akin to Art Farmer or Don Cherry according to Mover.

Fellow saxophonist, NEA Jazz Master and teacher Phil Woods provides the liner notes, concisely noting each track and Mover’s ample chops as well as the rhythm section to die for. Kenny Barron, who duos with Mover on “Gone with The Wind” and “You’ve Changed” is superlative throughout the two discs and their interplay suggests the glory days when Barron played with Stan Getz -- that tightness and easy communication is evident between Barron and Mover. Mover has released nine records as a leader, played with a who’s who of jazz greats and keeps his pulse on contemporary sounds (collaborating with Esperanza Spalding, for instance.) My Heart Tells Me is a rewarding session and the perfect introduction to Mover’s heart-and-soul style. Whether you’re in the mood for Cole Porter and after hour torch songs or straight-ahead bebop fire with an agile band, Mover’s got you covered. (16 tracks; 54 minutes / 47 minutes)

Labels: , , , , , , ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home