LYNNE ARRIALE, CONVERGENCE


It’s easy to forget how great a pianist Lynne Arriale is. Schooled in post bop, she launched her career in 1993 with a series of remarkable recordings for the audiophile DMP label. With an affinity for melodic invention and contrapuntal explorations, she’s at home playing Monk or the Beatles and her individualistic style of jazz has become more affecting over the years. Although she records primarily in a trio setting, “Convergence” (Motema Records) pairs her with the adventurous saxophonist Bill McHenry and a powerful, astute rhythm section (bassist Omer Avital and drummer Anthony Pinciotti) on a focused and nicely intense set of originals and modern pop covers by the likes of Trent Reznor and Mick Jagger. Expectedly, her interpretations of “Here Comes The Sun,” and Sting’s “Sister Moon” are brainy and beautiful and they connect on satisfying emotional level. Arriale strips Deborah Harry’s “Call Me” of its pop provenance and casts it as a meaty vehicle for McHenry’s bluesy sax and her own sharply swinging style. Even a simple ballad, the stunning original, “For Peace,” allows Arriale and her quartet to invite you to listen closely, covertly seducing you through their melodic interplay. By the way, for those with hi-fi rigs, the recording by Dae Bennett is among the best I’ve heard so far this year. (11 tracks; 51:53 minutes)
      

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JAZZ IN SPACE: LYNNE ARRIALE, CONVERGENCE

Saturday, January 29, 2011

LYNNE ARRIALE, CONVERGENCE


It’s easy to forget how great a pianist Lynne Arriale is. Schooled in post bop, she launched her career in 1993 with a series of remarkable recordings for the audiophile DMP label. With an affinity for melodic invention and contrapuntal explorations, she’s at home playing Monk or the Beatles and her individualistic style of jazz has become more affecting over the years. Although she records primarily in a trio setting, “Convergence” (Motema Records) pairs her with the adventurous saxophonist Bill McHenry and a powerful, astute rhythm section (bassist Omer Avital and drummer Anthony Pinciotti) on a focused and nicely intense set of originals and modern pop covers by the likes of Trent Reznor and Mick Jagger. Expectedly, her interpretations of “Here Comes The Sun,” and Sting’s “Sister Moon” are brainy and beautiful and they connect on satisfying emotional level. Arriale strips Deborah Harry’s “Call Me” of its pop provenance and casts it as a meaty vehicle for McHenry’s bluesy sax and her own sharply swinging style. Even a simple ballad, the stunning original, “For Peace,” allows Arriale and her quartet to invite you to listen closely, covertly seducing you through their melodic interplay. By the way, for those with hi-fi rigs, the recording by Dae Bennett is among the best I’ve heard so far this year. (11 tracks; 51:53 minutes)
      

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